Adventist Review Online | ‘Sabbath Walk’ Created at Camp Facilities in Australia

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Volunteers construct the start of the Sabbath Walk path outside the Little Chapel at the Stuarts Point Convention Centre in New South Wales, Australia. [Photo: Adventist Record]

Adventist-managed Stuarts Point Convention Centre will now witness to visitors.

A new nature walk that commemorates the seventh-day Sabbath has been built and opened at Stuarts Point Convention Centre, a Seventh-day Adventist camp in New South Wales, Australia.

The project was envisioned by retired pastor and evangelist Allan Lindsay, born from something he had seen overseas: a walk in beautiful surroundings, interspersed with information points along the way, telling the story of Sabbath. Lindsay is delighted that his dream has come true and said he trusts it will be a blessing to all who walk along the path.

Starting at the little chapel, the walk passes behind the motel accommodation and through the trees for 1.6 kilometers (1 mile), finishing behind the main meeting venue known as the Big Tent.

“For weeks before the project date, notices were put in church bulletins calling volunteers for the project,” organizers said. “More than 25 agreed to help, traveling from as far as the Queensland border, from New South Wales towns of Guyra, Cooranbong, Lake Macquarie, Port Macquarie, and Sydney. Those from Port Macquarie came with their heavy equipment to help with earthworks.” 

Between March 15 and 17, 2020, just before COVID-19 restrictions came into effect in New South Wales, the group carved out the walkway and erected sandstone pillars that tell the story of Sabbath.

Despite periods of heavy rain, the workers were able to prepare items inside the Big Camp shed for after the rain stopped, thanks to John Lang’s organization.

Having prepared the cement beds at allocated positions along the walk, the team erected waist-high sandstone pillars and then sealed them to bring out the colors of the stone.

“Information plaques were then attached to each pillar before the pillars were surrounded by a bed of wood chips to allow people to stand close to view and read the wording inscribed,” organizers said. “These plaques tell the Sabbath story.”

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