Pathfinders Seek to Break Guinness World Record at International Camporee – Seventh-day Adventist Church

0
605

Partial view of the massive neckerchief, as Pathfinder volunteers help unroll it in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, United States, on August 12, 2019. Photo: Costin Jordache

August 15, 2019 | Oshkosh, Wisconsin, United States | Lindsey Gendke, for Texas Conference News

The projected world’s largest “neckerchief and woggle” (scarf and slide) arrived in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, United States on August 12, 2019, for the Pathfinder International Camporee. Measuring around 300 feet (91 meters) from tip to tip and 150 feet (46 meters) from the center to back tip, the scarf portion was created by Texas Pathfinders and weighs approximately 800 pounds (360 kilograms). Designed by Arkansas Louisiana Conference of Seventh-day Adventists members, the shield for the slide measures about 10 feet (3 meters) tall and weighs about 500 pounds (227 kilograms).

Marilyn Boismier, Texas Conference of Seventh-day Adventists Pathfinder coordinator; Ruben Albarran, Texas Conference North Dallas area Pathfinder coordinator; and Lloyd Clapp, retired Arkansas-Louisiana Conference Pathfinder director, figured out the logistics for this enormous undertaking.

“This project appealed to me,” Boismier says, “because I like to make things, and I like math; the design was an exercise in math.” Both designers, Boismier and Clapp worked through calculations and concepts, talking with others, pricing materials, and praying before they were ready for the action phase. Both the scarf and slide were completed in stages and contained separate, smaller projects.

Volunteers help unroll the 300-foot (91-meter) Pathfinders’ neckerchief, thought to be largest in the world. Photo: Costin Jordache

Once Boismier worked out the details, she handed off the project to Albarran, who enlisted around 250 North Texas Pathfinders to physically sew the scarf, mostly at the Richardson Seventh-day Adventist Church Family Life Center in Richardson, Texas.

The process was truly a group effort with an average of 7 to 10 people per day showing up to create what Boismier describes as an “assembly line” to sew and pin the 64 pieces of poly-cotton, which amounted to approximately 800 pounds (360 kilograms) of fabric.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here