Training expands for substance abuse prevention program in Southeast Asia

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Sep 22, 2016
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Cavite, Philippines
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Training expands for substance abuse prevention program in Southeast Asia

Youth Alive (YA) training participants were equipped to implement YA in their areas around the Church’s Southern Asia-Pacific territory. [Photo courtesy of Asia-Pacific International University]

Global drug and tobacco usage has long been a focus of groups such as the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). Recent statistics such as those from the 2015 UNODC World Drug Report show an increased usage in Southeast Asia, especially among those more marginalized in society such as women and youth.

In response, the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the Asia-Pacific region (SSD) offered a training event September 8-12, 2016 for youth substance abuse prevention at the Asia-Pacific International University in Muak Lek, Thailand.

Deemed a “Youth Alive” core group meeting, 56 participants from 10 countries learned the how to offer training in their local communities.

Lhalaine Alfanoso, SSD health ministries director, explains, “This is a General Conference program that is a coordination of Health, Youth and Education [departments]. Basically, the Youth Alive program is a substance abuse prevention program for youth with the Health department being the one preparing modules & programs. During our planning, we wanted to also focus on different issues Adventist youth, our target group, face in Southeast Asia.”

Youth Alive has a decade-long history in the Philippines. Proponents list benefits such as leadership development, positive peer influences, community outreach, personal enrichment and spiritual growth.

Arnel Gabon, health ministries director for the North Philippines Union Conference and an experienced youth director, notes, “One of the beautiful things about Youth Alive is the friendship group. Participants are grouped into 8-12 member groups and they have family group activities which makes them close to each other.”

Gabon also highlighted the relational aspect in changing students’ relationships with their communities, others and themselves. “We do this program in our academies and it helps our students to become positive influences, to study well and become better students. For me this a good preventive program for our academies to prevent drop-outs and student problems,” he concluded.

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